Traveling for business again? What can you deduct?

As we continue to come out of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be traveling again for business. Under tax law, there are a number of rules for deducting the cost of your out-of-town business travel within the United States. These rules apply if the business conducted out of town reasonably requires an overnight stay.

Collective impact projects find strength in numbers

Collective impact projects are collaborations between not-for-profits, government, businesses and communities with the goal of achieving challenging and complicated social objectives. They can succeed in ways that simply aren’t available to individual organizations. But they also require a level of commitment your nonprofit may not be prepared for.

Recordkeeping DOs and DON’Ts for business meal and vehicle expenses

If you’re claiming deductions for business meals or auto expenses, expect the IRS to closely review them. In some cases, taxpayers have incomplete documentation or try to create records months (or years) later. In doing so, they fail to meet the strict substantiation requirements set forth under tax law. Tax auditors are adept at rooting out inconsistencies, omissions and errors in taxpayers’ records, as illustrated by one recent U.S. Tax Court case.

Nonprofits: Limit disaster damage with a plan

COVID-19 was a kind of disaster most not-for-profits weren’t prepared for. As your organization recovers from this unusual event, don’t let it become vulnerable to other, more common, threats. Every nonprofit needs a formal disaster plan for such risks as a fire, natural disaster or terrorist attack.

Hiring your minor children this summer? Reap tax and nontax benefits

If you’re a business owner and you hire your children this summer, you can obtain tax breaks and other nontax benefits. The kids can gain on-the-job experience, spend time with you, save for college and learn how to manage money. And you may be able to:

  • Shift your high-taxed income into tax-free or low-taxed income,
  • Realize payroll tax savings (depending on the child’s age and how your business is organized), and
  • Enable retirement plan contributions for the children.

Eligible Businesses: Claim the Employee Retention Tax Credit

The Employee Retention Tax Credit (ERTC) is a valuable tax break that was extended and modified by the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), enacted in March of 2021. Here’s a rundown of the rules.

Background

Back in March of 2020, Congress originally enacted the ERTC in the CARES Act to encourage employers to hire and retain employees during the pandemic. At that time, the ERTC applied to wages paid after March 12, 2020, and before January 1, 2021. However, Congress later modified and extended the ERTC to apply to wages paid before July 1, 2021.

Plan ahead for the 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax

High-income taxpayers face a 3.8% net investment income tax (NIIT) that’s imposed in addition to regular income tax. Fortunately, there are some steps you may be able to take to reduce its impact.

The NIIT applies to you only if modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) exceeds:

  • $250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly and surviving spouses,
  • $125,000 for married taxpayers filing separately,
  • $200,000 for unmarried taxpayers and heads of household.

The amount subject to the tax is the lesser of your net investment income or the amount by which your MAGI exceeds the threshold ($250,000, $200,000, or $125,000) that applies to you.

Making the decision to hire new nonprofit staffers

Many Americans remain unemployed due to the COVID-19 pandemic — at least 9.8 million at the end of April, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. But that’s expected to change quickly as employers ramp up hiring activities. If your not-for-profit will soon need new staffers, you might want to start putting out feelers now.

Obviously, the decision to hire is a difficult one considering the economic uncertainty that may remain. But you also don’t want to miss out on the best talent. Here are some issues to consider.